Beyond Technology – Creating Images with Heart

Cloud forest, Glacier National Park, Montana
Cloud forest, Glacier National Park, Montana

In today’s mobile world of social media and online everything we are exposed to more daily imagery than at any previous time in history. As a result, our visual sensitivity is developing at a rapid rate along with the need to mentally process these images in a timely manner.

Much the same way we have a hard time watching the dated animation from old sci-fi movies,  it’s easy to become more critical of what we like (and Like on Facebook). And with all of the various processing techniques (HDR, focus stacking, exposure blending to name a few) it’s also easy to be lulled into sensory overload from this highly polished visual world. But whatever technology may hold for the future, one thing will never change and that’s the need to create an emotional response with our images.

A technically perfect image may have the wow factor of a Hollywood blockbuster, but perfection does not necessarily create heart – and that’s really what photography is all about. Regardless of the subject matter, lens used or processing applied, convey the mood and emotion in your images through lighting, weather or technique and your photography will always rise above the crowd.

“Don’t shoot what it looks like. Shoot what it feels like.”   -David Alan Harvey

 

©Russ Bishop/All Rights Reserved

Chaco Canyon

Interior doorways at Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Culture National Historic Park, New Mexico
Interior doorways at Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Culture National Historic Park, New Mexico

Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico is the largest concentration of ancient pueblos in the southwest. At its center, Chaco Canyon was a major cultural center of the Anasazi or Ancient Pueblo People between AD 900 and 1150, and contains the most impressive ancient ruins north of Mexico.

Situated high on the Colorado Plateau at over 6,000 feet, the Anasazi were skilled masons and built fifteen major structures at Chaco. Called Great Houses, they included the impressive 650 room Pueblo Bonito (a world heritage site) using stone and timber brought in on a network of roads from up to 15 miles away. They also practiced astronomy and experts believe their buildings were aligned to capture the solar and lunar cycles. Many of them remained the largest buildings in North America until the 19th century.

No one knows exactly why this powerful culture suddenly disappeared in the late 12th century, but they left behind a lasting legacy in stone.

 

©Russ Bishop/All Rights Reserved

International Women’s Day

Climber on the summit of Tenaya Peak, Yosemite National Park, California

March 8th is International Women’s Day!

Celebrating all the ladies out there today – the mothers, daughters, sisters, partners and friends. You are strong and agile, you add beauty and grace to this often chaotic world, you are the best companions to share in our adventures – and you deserve equality in the workplace and in life. #plegeforparity

Enjoy your day!

 

©Russ Bishop/All Rights Reserved