2019 – The Year in Pictures

It’s hard to believe another year is coming to a close, but looking back on 2019 I’m filled with gratitude and amazement for the visual opportunities that I’ve been fortunate to witness.

Over a decade ago Jim Goldstein began this popular project, which has evolved over the years to include numerous friends and colleagues whose work continues to be a source of inspiration.

Here I’ve selected a few of my favorite images released in the past year. These are not necessarily my best or most popular, but each represents a special moment in time in which the beauty of this amazing world (both natural and man-made) passed before my lens.

Please share and enjoy! And feel free to let me know your thoughts. You can click on any image for a large high quality view, to learn more about it or share individually. I look forward to your selects in the weeks ahead, and wish everyone a wonderful holiday and Happy New Year!

-Russ

 

Sunset over the bay at Zaton, Dalmatian Coast, Croatia
Sunset over the bay at Zaton, Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

Fishing nets drying in the sun, Sipanska Luka, Sipan Island, Dalmatian Coast, Croatia
Fishing nets drying in the sun, Sipanska Luka, Sipan Island, Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

Soaptree Yucca (Yucca elata) and dunes, White Sands National Park, New Mexico
Soaptree Yucca (Yucca elata) and dunes, White Sands National Park, New Mexico

California Poppies and Goldfield, Antelope Valley, California
California Poppies and Goldfield, Antelope Valley, California

Akaka Falls and kahili ginger, Akaka Falls State Park, Hamakua Coast, Hawaii 
Akaka Falls and kahili ginger, Akaka Falls State Park, Hamakua Coast, Hawaii
Slickrock formations in upper Antelope Canyon, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona
Slickrock formations in upper Antelope Canyon, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona

Pololu Valley and beach through hala trees, North Kohala, Hawaii
Pololu Valley and beach through hala trees, North Kohala, Hawaii

Slickrock formations in lower Antelope Canyon, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona
Slickrock formations in lower Antelope Canyon, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona

Evening light on Wukoki Ruin, Wupatki National Monument, Arizona
Evening light on Wukoki Ruin, Wupatki National Monument, Arizona

Sunset over Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park, California
Sunset over Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park, California

Evening light on the Fire Wave, Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada
Evening light on the Fire Wave, Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada

Giant Sequoia in the Congress Grove, Sequoia National Park, California
Giant Sequoia in the Congress Grove, Sequoia National Park, California

 

©Russ Bishop/All Rights Reserved

10 Hidden National Parks That Will Surprise You

Giant Sequoias amid young pines in the Giant Forest, Sequoia National Park, California (Russ Bishop/Russ Bishop Photography)

Giant sequoia amid young pines in the Giant Forest, Sequoia National Park, California

Today’s entry is a guest post by James Sermons with the National Park Foundation. As the official charity for America’s National Parks they play an integral part in preserving our incredible national heritage,  and I encourage you join me in supporting their efforts. Take it away James.

The National Park System was founded in 1916 and has served as an opportunity for every American to access hundreds of the most treasured places in the United States. While many national parks and their campgrounds—Yellowstone, Yosemite, and the Grand Canyon—are household names, there are hundreds more underrated national parks that also offer life changing experiences.

Individuals who enjoy Yosemite National Park will be thrilled to visit Kings Canyon National Park in California. The canyons bear similarities to those in Yosemite and offer breathtaking scenery. Kings Canyon offers groves of sequoia trees, including its most famous resident, General Grant, the third largest tree in the world. California is also home to other underappreciated national parks including Channel Islands National Park and Lassen Volcanic National Park. Channel Islands National Park includes five of the Channel Islands and offers several stunning examples of independent island evolution, as 145 species on the islands cannot be found elsewhere. Also a favorite for whale-watchers, blue whales visit the islands occasionally and can be sighted from aboard a boat. Lassen Volcanic National Park boasts the most southern of the volcanoes in the Cascades range and showcases evidence of the volatile activity below the surface in numerous gas vents and boiling pools.

Further south, Saguaro National Park is a survivalist’s dream with the rugged and desolate landscape of the Sonoran Desert. This park cannot be reached by public transportation, but is easily driveable from Tucson. Traveling north, one cannot help but be drawn to the colorful red landscape of Utah. Visually stunning, and an undiscovered treat for photographers, Capitol Reef National Park contains a 100-mile long wrinkle in the landscape known as a geologic monocline. Some of the tallest sand dunes in the nation are located not far from here in awe-inspiring Great Sand Dunes National Park. Sandboarding and sand sledding offer a once-in-a-lifetime adventure for young children and those young at heart.

For photographers, artists, or those seeking something more scenic and relaxed, Big Bend National Park and Theodore Roosevelt National Park are good destinations as they both offer great opportunities to view wildlife and enjoy backcountry trails. For individuals interested in astronomy or weather phenomena, Great Basin National Park is a must-visit. And finally, while Wrangell-St. Elias National Park in Alaska is unknown by most Americans, this park is larger than many small countries and offers air taxis into the remote areas of the wilderness.

Though relatively unknown, each of these parks showcase stunning visual elements, exciting adventures and incredible travel experiences. For more information on America’s more than 400 national parks, including those which are less-traveled, visit the National Park Foundation and download their free Owner’s Guide to discover all of the hidden gems in the National Park System.

Outdoor Photographer April 2013 Cover

OP_April2013Cover

I’m honored to have the April 2013 cover of Outdoor Photographer Magazine!

As many of you know, Mount Whitney in the eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California is a favorite location of mine and a fantastic photographic subject. I’ve climbed the peak several times over the years (both the trail and technical routes), and spent countless hours exploring the fascinating Owen’s Valley beneath it. Situated on the Sierra crest in both Sequoia National Park and the John Muir Wilderness to the east,  it’s the highest peak in the United States outside Alaska and the most popular destination in what John Muir called the Range of Light.

On this particular morning all the elements came together. A clearing storm had just left a fresh dusting of snow on the peak, and the dawn light illuminated the warm desert rocks of the Alabama Hills to add a nice framing to this classic alpine scene.

©Russ Bishop/All Rights Reserved